Tuesday, January 31, 2012

George

Today was George Struck's birthday.  George was Mike's dad and he died just one month after we were married, nearly 34 years ago.   It has been a long time, yet he is still greatly missed.

Although I did not get to enjoy being his daughter-in-law for long, I am grateful that I'd known him for several years before his death.  George was quite a guy.  He was kind, he was funny, he loved his family and he was a man of faith.

I am happy to say that I see large bits of George in my own husband.  I love that!  When Mike raises his eyebrows a certain way and smiles a big smile, I see George.  When Mike throws his head back and laughs heartily, I see George.  I even sometimes see George in the way Mike drives a car.

I also see George's love of family displayed still by those he loved.  His grandchildren, who never met him, benefit because he showed his own children that family was important.  He showed his daughters how a man treats the woman he loves.  He showed his son how to be a faithful husband.

His sense of humor is displayed through  his children, grandchildren and even now his great-grandchild whenever they make a pun or a joke.   George was well-known for his sense of humor.  When I was in high school I was a cheerleader for awhile.  At one basketball game in a tiny gym with balcony seating a piece of paper came floating down to me.  When I retrieved it, thinking it must be something important, I read, "If my dentures fall down there, please don't step on them."  Yes, he was a bit of a character and he loved to laugh!

I see his caring and gentlemanly side in Mike as he serves his parishioners.  I see his faith in God spreading outward through Mike's sermons.  People who never met George benefit through his influence on Mike.

I suppose to someone on the outside looking in, George may have seemed like an ordinary man who grew his crop during the week and went to church each Sunday.  Looking back, I see a wonderful man who has influenced his descendants more than they will ever know.  Even now, 34 years later, we still miss him.